THE SFYRIA LANGUAGE OF GREECE

This Σφυριά / Sfyria language, of Evia, Greece, is a whistle language. Σφυριά, from the Greek word σφυρι (sfyri) for the noun whistle, symbolizes a militaristic stronghold against the enemy.

Vogel, who grew up in Alsace-Lorraine speaking French and German, has also become fluent in English, Portuguese, Farsi, Pashto and Khmer, the language spoken by the majority of people in Cambodia.

A professor at the Royal University of Fine Arts, he teaches — no surprise — linguistics and Sanskrit, which is closely related to Khmer.  A professor at the Royal University of Fine Arts, he teaches — no surprise — linguistics and Sanskrit, which is closely related to Khmer.

Outside the classroom since the mid-1900s, Vogel has pursued a passion project documenting a largely unwritten language spoken by members of the Bunong ethnic group.

The Bunong live in Cambodia’s sparsely populated Mondulkiri province, a place of mystical beauty under threat from modernization and encroachment by the Khmer population and foreign investment.

Earlier this year, Vogel’s work received a boost when

Outside the classroom since the mid-1900s, Vogel has pursued a passion project documenting a largely unwritten language spoken by members of the Bunong ethnic group.

The Bunong live in Cambodia’s sparsely populated Mondulkiri province, a place of mystical beauty under threat from modernization and encroachment by the Khmer population and foreign investment.

Earlier this year, Vogel’s work received a boost when it was recognized by the Fainting Robin Foundation. The U.S. organization supports independent scholars and announced in March that Vogel would be the first recipient of its “distinguished scholar” award.

Most of Vogel’s research over the years about the Bunong language and people was carried out at his own expense, said Peter Maguire, chairman of the Fainting Robin Foundation.